Art as Solace: Pinaree Sanpitak

sharebear19:

I love installation art, and I really with I could see Pinaree Sanpitak’s conceptual tribute to the Thailand peoples who suffered during that tragic 2011 Monsoon. Snapitak’s art may take after Eva Hesse in style, but her completed hammocks are distinguished from her predecessor by its religious (Theravada Buddhism common in Thialand) over tones and Thai aesthetics. She also has a singular dipping/drapping curve shape to her art, that embodies all of the warmth, grace and security of a mother’s breast while recalling the motions of the rising, consuming waters of a typhoon. If you have the opportunity to see this powerful exhibit you really would be remiss to not go.

Originally posted on Unframed The LACMA Blog:

In her installation Hanging by a Thread, Pinaree Sanpitak, a Thai conceptual artist, honors a national tragedy (the 2011 Monsoon floods). The work uses a flowers-patterned fabric, a textile very common in Thailand, which Pinaree stated “ . . . proved soothing, and brought back a sense of nostalgia . . . the ordinary. The local.”

Pinaree Sanpitak, Hanging by a Thread, 2012, Courtesy of the artist and Tyler Rollins Fine Art, New York. Installation views, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 2013 © Pinaree Sanpitak. LACMA/Museum Associates 2013

Pinaree Sanpitak, Hanging by a Thread , 2012, courtesy of the artist and Tyler Rollins Fine Art, New York. Installation views, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 2013 © Pinaree Sanpitak, LACMA/Museum Associates 2013

On the fourth floor of the Ahmanson Building, 18 hammocks hang in a dark gallery. They look like rare exotic vegetation crafted from the printed cotton textile, the paa-lai. It’s easy to imagine them as forms of the monsoon: terrifying, consuming waters transforming the Chao Phraya River that snakes through Bangkok like some mythic creature. But of course…

View original 625 more words

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s